April 30, 2010
Unless you start, there can be no success.
March 24, 2010
T-shirt brief 2010
Background
The idea behind The Do Lectures is a simple one. That people who Do things can inspire the rest of us to go and Do amazing things too.
Their stories are powerful and show us the way forward like cats eyes in the road. They give us both practical know how and much needed inspiration to go and Do something too.
So once a year The Do Lectures holds a set of inspirational lectures down here in a beautiful part of West Wales.
‘Inspirational Ideas Delivered Free to the World Via the internet.’
All the talks are filmed and are then shown for free. It provides a stage for inspirational people from all walks of life to share their ideas, to challenge convention, to rewrite business models, to change entire industries, to invent new and better ways of doing things for a world with limited resources.
This melting pot of ideas has been set up with the purpose of creating positive change.
Each year to help fund the event, we Do some Do Lectures T-shirts. They help us raise some money for The Do Lectures and get more people to know about us.
Restrictions:

Don’t go over two colours if you can help it, it just gets expensive to do.
Deadline:
May 1st, 2010
Communication
Communicate the energy of the word Do.
The word Do is all verb. It sums up the speakers. They are life’s doers. Those who don’t just sit there but get up and go and do something. They have the idea, but lots of people have ideas. They also have the energy, the stubbornness to go and make it happen. They are walking verbs.
Things we need
It needs to say The Do Lectures and use The Do Logo. But that can be as small as you want. And you can play with the logo.
For may 1st, concentrate on the idea. I wouldn’t go to the bother of art working it up. The best idea wins and not the most finished.
Prize.
The winner will receive a ticket for the Do Lectures worth £1K.
The T-shirt will go on sale and the profit from it will go to help fund The Do Lectures.
The winner will be PR’d to the creative press as the winner of this competition and hopefully pick up some press for themselves.
Our aim this year is to get 1 million people to see the talks, so your work will be seen by lots of people, lots of times.
Rules.
Although you have some constraints like featuring ‘The Do Lectures 2010’ or just the word Do, everything else is up for grabs. And yes, you can mess with the logo.
The best work will break some rules or even ignore this brief.
The T-shirt can be illustration, type only, photography. Pretty much anything goes. But if you have a simple idea, you won’t need to rely on technique too much.
Be as creative as your talent allows
Be original. Be different. Give the word Do some energy. Make it powerful.
And as always, Do something you love.
Deadline
May 1st. 2010.
Submissions.
Send your ideas in jpeg form to: info@thedolectures.co.uk
Don’t send any artwork at this point.
If you prefer to send them via mail, don’t forget to put your name and address on your work.
Postal Address:
The Do Lectures
The Chicken Shed
Cardigan
SA43 3DR
Email: info@thedolectures.co.uk
formula for change
posted by David Hieatt

T-shirt brief 2010

Background

The idea behind The Do Lectures is a simple one. That people who Do things can inspire the rest of us to go and Do amazing things too.

Their stories are powerful and show us the way forward like cats eyes in the road. They give us both practical know how and much needed inspiration to go and Do something too.

So once a year The Do Lectures holds a set of inspirational lectures down here in a beautiful part of West Wales.

‘Inspirational Ideas Delivered Free to the World Via the internet.’

All the talks are filmed and are then shown for free. It provides a stage for inspirational people from all walks of life to share their ideas, to challenge convention, to rewrite business models, to change entire industries, to invent new and better ways of doing things for a world with limited resources.

This melting pot of ideas has been set up with the purpose of creating positive change.

Each year to help fund the event, we Do some Do Lectures T-shirts. They help us raise some money for The Do Lectures and get more people to know about us.

Restrictions:

Don’t go over two colours if you can help it, it just gets expensive to do.

Deadline:

May 1st, 2010

Communication

Communicate the energy of the word Do.

The word Do is all verb. It sums up the speakers. They are life’s doers. Those who don’t just sit there but get up and go and do something. They have the idea, but lots of people have ideas. They also have the energy, the stubbornness to go and make it happen. They are walking verbs.

Things we need

It needs to say The Do Lectures and use The Do Logo. But that can be as small as you want. And you can play with the logo.

For may 1st, concentrate on the idea. I wouldn’t go to the bother of art working it up. The best idea wins and not the most finished.

Prize.

The winner will receive a ticket for the Do Lectures worth £1K.

The T-shirt will go on sale and the profit from it will go to help fund The Do Lectures.

The winner will be PR’d to the creative press as the winner of this competition and hopefully pick up some press for themselves.

Our aim this year is to get 1 million people to see the talks, so your work will be seen by lots of people, lots of times.

Rules.

Although you have some constraints like featuring ‘The Do Lectures 2010’ or just the word Do, everything else is up for grabs. And yes, you can mess with the logo.

The best work will break some rules or even ignore this brief.

The T-shirt can be illustration, type only, photography. Pretty much anything goes. But if you have a simple idea, you won’t need to rely on technique too much.

Be as creative as your talent allows

Be original. Be different. Give the word Do some energy. Make it powerful.

And as always, Do something you love.

Deadline

May 1st. 2010.

Submissions.

Send your ideas in jpeg form to: info@thedolectures.co.uk

Don’t send any artwork at this point.

If you prefer to send them via mail, don’t forget to put your name and address on your work.

Postal Address:

The Do Lectures

The Chicken Shed

Cardigan

SA43 3DR

Email: info@thedolectures.co.uk

formula for change

posted by David Hieatt

Feedback from Last Year’s Do.. 

‘It was like a double shot of fresh air for my brain. Thank you.’

‘Better than Ted’ 

‘It was the most inspiring and abundant event I have ever attended.

‘Thanks again for the super fun times. I have been trying really hard to describe everything to my wife.  What a great week.’
‘A cross between the Burning Man, the Ted lectures and Where The Wild Things Are’.

‘Truly excellent.’ 
‘Great job and great lectures — I think you all have
A very special thing going out there in West Wales.
‘There’s a reason that there is not a 5 star Michelin restaurant that seats over 50 folks.  Small is beautiful.  Oh yeah…LOVED not getting emails…

‘When I say I loved the Do Lectures, I really mean I fell in love with them.  The location, the hosting, the food, attendees and of course the speakers all blended together to form a magical mix. 
‘It’s the most important event of its kind..’

‘You gave me the greatest experience and I will remember it forever.’

You gave me the greatest experience and I will remember it forever.
It certainly for me was the most inspiring ‘conference’ event thing, (which it clearly isn’t) that I’ve taken part in.

‘A bonfire with soul’

‘It was like putting a hell of a lot of interesting, clever, funny, sparky people in a blender. In a field. ‘

‘A cross between the Burning Man, the Ted lectures and Where The Wild Things Are’.

‘A place of storytelling.  A place of inspiration.’  ‘It has a Genius of Place.’

‘I jumped in a river with some of the smartest, kindest, friendliest people on the planet..’

‘Sotherby’s could learn a lot how to auction axes from these people’

‘The meals taught us that food is not a thing but a relationship.  Damn that food was good…’   ‘I laughed.  I laughed a lot.  Fuel for the soul…’

‘Revolutions can start in that pub..’

‘A melting pot of people and ideas. Just an amazing event. 

I am sure people will get sick of me going on about how great it was.


And that fforest, well it gives something so magical which feels key to the vibe and open-ness
Thanks for a Wonderful Amazing and Unique event - it was just brilliant!!!Hello Do folk, My nice work paid for me to go to The Do Lectures. Before they did, though, they asked me to write the ‘business case’ for my ticket. But back in May all I really had was a hunch that going to Do would be magic, so I persuaded them to go along with that. When I got home last night, I wrote the business case. I sent it to my boss and the MD. I thought you might like to see it too.  And please pass on my big fat thanks to all the Doers. It was a wonderful Welsh weekend.  Molly Pink-Boots.  *** What I did at Do.  I got up at 7am, I went to bed at 1am, and for six hours I slept in a tent in a field with four other people. From 7.30am to 1am, every day, for four days, I listened, questioned, ate, ran, chatted, ate some more, sang, picked some very brainy brains, laughed a lot, sipped wine and spent most of the time outside in fresh air and quite a bit of mud.  It was like putting a hell of a lot of interesting, clever, funny, sparky people in a blender. In a field. No one wore name tags. Everyone camped. Everyone chatted. Everyone ate together. I danced with a 60-year-old Swedish man. I talked branding with an 18-year-old volunteer who turned up at Do after a plea for help on Twitter. I laughed with an amazing Danish man called Uffe who founded a new school and a new way of learning (and who sleepwalks – but that wasn’t in his talk). I asked the deputy editor of Wired magazine cheeky questions (and he helped fix my digital camera – but that wasn’t in his talk either). I jumped in a river with some of the smartest, kindest, friendliest people on the planet. I was nicknamed The Word Whisperer by an American marketing guru called Duke, Molly Pink-Boots by a gamer extraordinaire, and a Gazelle by Ade, The Fastest Man In Cardigan. I laughed some more with a Welsh farmer who told some of the best stories I’ve ever heard (and whose talk about stopping GM foods made me want to cry). I borrowed a Liverpudlian lecturer’s wife’s scarf, and was all the warmer for it.  I learnt that axes are interesting. And heavy. So chopping wood is hard (I tried it for the first time).  That concrete is not mud, and running on both is different. (Mud is better.) That all concrete is most definitely not the same. Just add water and see.  That most companies are creatures without heads. (Turns out, the ones with heads were in a tipi in a field in Wales.) That food is tastier outside. That standing in stars and looking up at stars is magic. That birds are naughty.  That we should copy nature (especially birds…) That it is cold at night. And lovely.  That King Creosote is a King Comedian. That we should keep the world weird.   That DJs who play trumpets and whistles rock.  That sheepdogs look good on the dance floor.   That there’s more to maps than meet the eye. Much, much more.  That you can make a bread and butter pudding out of chocolate croissants. It is very very good and very very bad in equal measure (actually, maybe a bit more good).  That it’s best to use PowerPoint presentations for doodles. That Sotheby’s should hold axe auctions in tents.  That uncomfortable is good.  That making glorious mistakes is even better.  That talking to people who don’t do what you do gives your brain a shake.  That howies know how to do things properly. And all their people are howies through and through. Plus they serve their t-shirts warm.  That it’s good to turn up in a field in Wales knowing absolutely no one and see what happens.  That I should jump in more rivers.  None of it was about writing. And yet lots of it was. It was much more valuable than any normal ‘course’ about tone of voice, branding and words. It was like a double shot of fresh air for my brain.  Thank you.  Molly — 



 

Feedback from Last Year’s Do..

It was like a double shot of fresh air for my brain.
Thank you.’

‘Better than Ted’

‘It was the most inspiring and abundant event I have ever attended.

‘Thanks again for the super fun times. I have been trying really hard to describe everything to my wife.
What a great week.’

‘A cross between the Burning Man, the Ted lectures and Where The Wild Things Are’.

‘Truly excellent.’

‘Great job and great lectures — I think you all have

A very special thing going out there in West Wales.

‘There’s a reason that there is not a 5 star Michelin restaurant that seats over 50 folks.  Small is beautiful.  Oh yeah…LOVED not getting emails…

‘When I say I loved the Do Lectures, I really mean I fell in love with them.  The location, the hosting, the food, attendees and of course the speakers all blended together to form a magical mix.


‘It’s the most important event of its kind..’

‘You gave me the greatest experience and I will remember it forever.’

You gave me the greatest experience and I will remember it forever.

It certainly for me was the most inspiring ‘conference’ event thing, (which it clearly isn’t) that I’ve taken part in.

‘A bonfire with soul’

‘It was like putting a hell of a lot of interesting, clever, funny, sparky people in a blender. In a field.

‘A cross between the Burning Man, the Ted lectures and Where The Wild Things Are’.

‘A place of storytelling.  A place of inspiration.’

 ‘It has a Genius of Place.’

I jumped in a river with some of the smartest, kindest, friendliest people on the planet..’

‘Sotherby’s could learn a lot how to auction axes from these people’

‘The meals taught us that food is not a thing but a relationship.  Damn that food was good…’
 
‘I laughed.  I laughed a lot.  Fuel for the soul…’

‘Revolutions can start in that pub..’

‘A melting pot of people and ideas. Just an amazing event.

I am sure people will get sick of me going on about how great it was.

And that fforest, well it gives something so magical which feels key to the vibe and open-ness


Thanks for a Wonderful Amazing and Unique event - it was just brilliant!!!
Hello Do folk,

My nice work paid for me to go to The Do Lectures. Before they did, though, they asked me to write the ‘business case’ for my ticket. But back in May all I really had was a hunch that going to Do would be magic, so I persuaded them to go along with that.

When I got home last night, I wrote the business case. I sent it to my boss and the MD. I thought you might like to see it too.

And please pass on my big fat thanks to all the Doers. It was a wonderful Welsh weekend.

Molly Pink-Boots.


***

What I did at Do.
I got up at 7am, I went to bed at 1am, and for six hours I slept in a tent in a field with four other people. From 7.30am to 1am, every day, for four days, I listened, questioned, ate, ran, chatted, ate some more, sang, picked some very brainy brains, laughed a lot, sipped wine and spent most of the time outside in fresh air and quite a bit of mud.
It was like putting a hell of a lot of interesting, clever, funny, sparky people in a blender. In a field. No one wore name tags. Everyone camped. Everyone chatted. Everyone ate together. I danced with a 60-year-old Swedish man. I talked branding with an 18-year-old volunteer who turned up at Do after a plea for help on Twitter. I laughed with an amazing Danish man called Uffe who founded a new school and a new way of learning (and who sleepwalks – but that wasn’t in his talk). I asked the deputy editor of Wired magazine cheeky questions (and he helped fix my digital camera – but that wasn’t in his talk either). I jumped in a river with some of the smartest, kindest, friendliest people on the planet. I was nicknamed The Word Whisperer by an American marketing guru called Duke, Molly Pink-Boots by a gamer extraordinaire, and a Gazelle by Ade, The Fastest Man In Cardigan. I laughed some more with a Welsh farmer who told some of the best stories I’ve ever heard (and whose talk about stopping GM foods made me want to cry). I borrowed a Liverpudlian lecturer’s wife’s scarf, and was all the warmer for it.
I learnt that axes are interesting. And heavy. So chopping wood is hard (I tried it for the first time).
That concrete is not mud, and running on both is different. (Mud is better.)
That all concrete is most definitely not the same. Just add water and see.
That most companies are creatures without heads. (Turns out, the ones with heads were in a tipi in a field in Wales.)
That food is tastier outside.
That standing in stars and looking up at stars is magic.
That birds are naughty.
That we should copy nature (especially birds…)
That it is cold at night. And lovely.
That King Creosote is a King Comedian.
That we should keep the world weird.  
That DJs who play trumpets and whistles rock.
That sheepdogs look good on the dance floor.  
That there’s more to maps than meet the eye. Much, much more.
That you can make a bread and butter pudding out of chocolate croissants. It is very very good and very very bad in equal measure (actually, maybe a bit more good).
That it’s best to use PowerPoint presentations for doodles.
That Sotheby’s should hold axe auctions in tents.
That uncomfortable is good.
That making glorious mistakes is even better.
That talking to people who don’t do what you do gives your brain a shake.
That howies know how to do things properly. And all their people are howies through and through. Plus they serve their t-shirts warm.
That it’s good to turn up in a field in Wales knowing absolutely no one and see what happens.
That I should jump in more rivers.
None of it was about writing. And yet lots of it was. It was much more valuable than any normal ‘course’ about tone of voice, branding and words. It was like a double shot of fresh air for my brain.
Thank you.

Molly

 

March 2, 2010
Tickets are still available
info@thedolectures.co.uk

Tickets are still available

info@thedolectures.co.uk

December 9, 2009

new DO number

01239 682878

December 5, 2009
The Do Phone will be back on Monday morning 10am.
Tel: 07760 757633
So don’t panic. There are still some tickets left.
(Pic of Teifi river that runs by the side of Fforest)

The Do Phone will be back on Monday morning 10am.

Tel: 07760 757633

So don’t panic. There are still some tickets left.

(Pic of Teifi river that runs by the side of Fforest)

November 27, 2009
Today’s mighty oak is just yesterday’s nut that held it’s ground
Why The Do Lectures matter?
 
We live in interesting times.
Most of the important business models have yet to be written. Most of the ‘why didn’t I think of that’ answers for climate change have yet to be dreamt of. Most of the important scientific or technological breakthroughs are just doodles on a notepad.
As well as interesting times, these are exciting times.
Necessity will make a good taskmaster. Crisis will make a good editor. Having finite resources will make us infinitely more creative with how we use them going forward.
Yup, interesting times.
And if consumers are changing how they consume, and if business is changing how they do business, then so will Government have to change how they govern.
And how we’ve treated this planet in the past will be different to how we treat it in the future. Currently a tree is only worth something when it’s cut down. Yet while it’s alive and vertical it produces oxygen, rain and sucks in carbon dioxide.
Indeed these are interesting times.
But rather than being a time to be down or despondent, this is the time for great change. And yes, there is much that needs changing. There is much to do.
But reassuringly the human mind is more creative than any computer will ever be. The answers will come from the brightest, stubborn-nest, and oddest of people.
And the thing that brings this oddball bunch together is that they are all stubborn dreamers. Brilliant enough to have the idea. Stubborn enough to make it happen.
Buckminster Fuller described the importance of vision best when he said, “ There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly”. But as well as the vision, you need that grit determination to make your idea live.
Why buying a ticket matters too?
That is what The Do Lectures is here to Do. It is a platform for the Doers of the world to tell us their stories. So they can inspire the rest of us to go do something amazing too. In simple farming terms, it’s the manure for the field. It’s here to help grow ideas.
The Do Lectures is not a business, but it has to pay its way in the world. Appropriately a set of talks with sustainability at its heart needs to be, well, yes, sustainable.
To that end, we sell tickets for the event so the rest of the world can see them the talks for free. Our aim this year is for a million people to see the talks.
So does the Do Lectures matter? I believe they do. And maybe they matter more in these interesting times than any other time. I believe that ‘mind manure’ needs spreading around.
So my last question today is would you buy a ticket for The Do Lectures?
So if this is crowd funding in its truest form, we need the crowd to put their hands up and say ‘I’m in.’ ‘I think The Do Lectures matter. Here’s my hard earned money.’
A simple email to info@thedolectures.co.uk will be enough to start this off.

Why The Do Lectures matter?

We live in interesting times.

Most of the important business models have yet to be written. Most of the ‘why didn’t I think of that’ answers for climate change have yet to be dreamt of. Most of the important scientific or technological breakthroughs are just doodles on a notepad.

As well as interesting times, these are exciting times.

Necessity will make a good taskmaster. Crisis will make a good editor. Having finite resources will make us infinitely more creative with how we use them going forward.

Yup, interesting times.

And if consumers are changing how they consume, and if business is changing how they do business, then so will Government have to change how they govern.

And how we’ve treated this planet in the past will be different to how we treat it in the future. Currently a tree is only worth something when it’s cut down. Yet while it’s alive and vertical it produces oxygen, rain and sucks in carbon dioxide.

Indeed these are interesting times.

But rather than being a time to be down or despondent, this is the time for great change. And yes, there is much that needs changing. There is much to do.

But reassuringly the human mind is more creative than any computer will ever be. The answers will come from the brightest, stubborn-nest, and oddest of people.

And the thing that brings this oddball bunch together is that they are all stubborn dreamers. Brilliant enough to have the idea. Stubborn enough to make it happen.

Buckminster Fuller described the importance of vision best when he said, “ There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly”. But as well as the vision, you need that grit determination to make your idea live.

Why buying a ticket matters too?

That is what The Do Lectures is here to Do. It is a platform for the Doers of the world to tell us their stories. So they can inspire the rest of us to go do something amazing too. In simple farming terms, it’s the manure for the field. It’s here to help grow ideas.

The Do Lectures is not a business, but it has to pay its way in the world. Appropriately a set of talks with sustainability at its heart needs to be, well, yes, sustainable.

To that end, we sell tickets for the event so the rest of the world can see them the talks for free. Our aim this year is for a million people to see the talks.

So does the Do Lectures matter? I believe they do. And maybe they matter more in these interesting times than any other time. I believe that ‘mind manure’ needs spreading around.

So my last question today is would you buy a ticket for The Do Lectures?

So if this is crowd funding in its truest form, we need the crowd to put their hands up and say ‘I’m in.’ ‘I think The Do Lectures matter. Here’s my hard earned money.’

A simple email to info@thedolectures.co.uk will be enough to start this off.

Tickets go on sale Tuesday 10am.
Here’s what you can expect.
What I did at Do.
I got up at 7am, I went to bed at 1am, and for six hours I slept in a tent in a field with four other people. From 7.30am to 1am, every day, for four days, I listened, questioned, ate, ran, chatted, ate some more, sang, picked some very brainy brains, laughed a lot, sipped wine and spent most of the time outside in fresh air and quite a bit of mud. It was like putting a hell of a lot of interesting, clever, funny, sparky people in a blender. In a field. No one wore name tags. Everyone camped. Everyone chatted. Everyone ate together. I danced with a 60-year-old Swedish man. I talked branding with an 18-year-old volunteer who turned up at Do after a plea for help on Twitter. I laughed with an amazing Danish man called Uffe who founded a new school and a new way of learning (and who sleepwalks – but that wasn’t in his talk). I asked the deputy editor of Wired magazine cheeky questions (and he helped fix my digital camera – but that wasn’t in his talk either). I jumped in a river with some of the smartest, kindest, friendliest people on the planet. I was nicknamed The Word Whisperer by an American marketing guru called Duke, Molly Pink-Boots by a gamer extraordinaire, and a Gazelle by Ade, The Fastest Man In Cardigan. I laughed some more with a Welsh farmer who told some of the best stories I’ve ever heard (and whose talk about stopping GM foods made me want to cry). I borrowed a Liverpudlian lecturer’s wife’s scarf, and was all the warmer for it. I learnt that axes are interesting. And heavy. So chopping wood is hard (I tried it for the first time). That concrete is not mud, and running on both is different. (Mud is better.) That all concrete is most definitely not the same. Just add water and see. That most companies are creatures without heads. (Turns out, the ones with heads were in a tipi in a field in Wales.) That food is tastier outside. That standing in stars and looking up at stars is magic. That birds are naughty. That we should copy nature (especially birds…) That it is cold at night. And lovely. That King Creosote is a King Comedian. That we should keep the world weird. That DJs who play trumpets and whistles rock. That sheepdogs look good on the dance floor. That there’s more to maps than meet the eye. Much, much more. That you can make a bread and butter pudding out of chocolate croissants. It is very very good and very very bad in equal measure (actually, maybe a bit more good). That it’s best to use PowerPoint presentations for doodles. That Sotheby’s should hold axe auctions in tents. That uncomfortable is good. That making glorious mistakes is even better. That talking to people who don’t do what you do gives your brain a shake. That howies know how to do things properly. And all their people are howies through and through. Plus they serve their t-shirts warm. That it’s good to turn up in a field in Wales knowing absolutely no one and see what happens. That I should jump in more rivers. None of it was about writing. And yet lots of it was. It was much more valuable than any normal ‘course’ about tone of voice, branding and words. It was like a double shot of fresh air for my brain.
Thank you. Molly

Tickets go on sale Tuesday 10am.

Here’s what you can expect.

What I did at Do.

I got up at 7am, I went to bed at 1am, and for six hours I slept in a tent in a field with four other people. From 7.30am to 1am, every day, for four days, I listened, questioned, ate, ran, chatted, ate some more, sang, picked some very brainy brains, laughed a lot, sipped wine and spent most of the time outside in fresh air and quite a bit of mud. It was like putting a hell of a lot of interesting, clever, funny, sparky people in a blender. In a field. No one wore name tags. Everyone camped. Everyone chatted. Everyone ate together. I danced with a 60-year-old Swedish man. I talked branding with an 18-year-old volunteer who turned up at Do after a plea for help on Twitter. I laughed with an amazing Danish man called Uffe who founded a new school and a new way of learning (and who sleepwalks – but that wasn’t in his talk). I asked the deputy editor of Wired magazine cheeky questions (and he helped fix my digital camera – but that wasn’t in his talk either). I jumped in a river with some of the smartest, kindest, friendliest people on the planet. I was nicknamed The Word Whisperer by an American marketing guru called Duke, Molly Pink-Boots by a gamer extraordinaire, and a Gazelle by Ade, The Fastest Man In Cardigan. I laughed some more with a Welsh farmer who told some of the best stories I’ve ever heard (and whose talk about stopping GM foods made me want to cry). I borrowed a Liverpudlian lecturer’s wife’s scarf, and was all the warmer for it. I learnt that axes are interesting. And heavy. So chopping wood is hard (I tried it for the first time). That concrete is not mud, and running on both is different. (Mud is better.) That all concrete is most definitely not the same. Just add water and see. That most companies are creatures without heads. (Turns out, the ones with heads were in a tipi in a field in Wales.) That food is tastier outside. That standing in stars and looking up at stars is magic. That birds are naughty. That we should copy nature (especially birds…) That it is cold at night. And lovely. That King Creosote is a King Comedian. That we should keep the world weird. That DJs who play trumpets and whistles rock. That sheepdogs look good on the dance floor. That there’s more to maps than meet the eye. Much, much more. That you can make a bread and butter pudding out of chocolate croissants. It is very very good and very very bad in equal measure (actually, maybe a bit more good). That it’s best to use PowerPoint presentations for doodles. That Sotheby’s should hold axe auctions in tents. That uncomfortable is good. That making glorious mistakes is even better. That talking to people who don’t do what you do gives your brain a shake. That howies know how to do things properly. And all their people are howies through and through. Plus they serve their t-shirts warm. That it’s good to turn up in a field in Wales knowing absolutely no one and see what happens. That I should jump in more rivers. None of it was about writing. And yet lots of it was. It was much more valuable than any normal ‘course’ about tone of voice, branding and words. It was like a double shot of fresh air for my brain.

Thank you. Molly

October 11, 2009
Play is good fun

Play is good fun